Official Community Plan Update

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Please note that in light of COVID-19 related precautions, all in-person events relating to the OCP are currently paused.

The OCP is an important bylaw that describes the long-term vision of community development in Prince Rupert. It includes objectives and policies that guide decisions on planning and land use management as well as defining social, economic and environmental policies.

Our current OCP was adopted in 2007 and is now 13 years old. Much has happened since the current plan was adopted. Most notable is the recent attention and action in developing our port facilities. The unveiling of the Prince Rupert 2030 The Vision strategy (The 2030 Vision) concluded a significant and collaborative effort to develop a vision for how Prince Rupert would respond to, manage and benefit from the impending growth expected for our ports. This expected port growth is anticipated to see a four-fold increase in trade capacity and could result in a doubling of our population over the next ten years.

The 2030 Vision was developed in a two phase process over three years and its exciting aspirations will be discussed with you and help inform the revision of our OCP. This survey is the next step in revising the OCP and builds on the 2030 Vision process. It will provide you with the opportunity for you to share your views on aspects of the OCP and the 2030 Vision document.

The City also launched a second round of surveys aimed at better understanding public opinion regarding the policy topics of infrastructure, climate change + GHG emissions, food systems/food security, and social services. See below for links to the surveys, which are also being sent via mail to community households. This second round of surveys closed September 15th, 2020. As a small thank you we will be giving ten $50 gift cards to randomly selected people that submit completed questionnaires

In September we will be scheduling short meetings with anyone that wants to come and speak with the Mayor and Planner about the draft OCP. You can sign up for one of these by contacting Executive Assistant, Brianne Bunko at brianne.bunko@princerupert.ca to set up an appointment.

Thank you for your continued interest and participation in this project.

Please note that in light of COVID-19 related precautions, all in-person events relating to the OCP are currently paused.

The OCP is an important bylaw that describes the long-term vision of community development in Prince Rupert. It includes objectives and policies that guide decisions on planning and land use management as well as defining social, economic and environmental policies.

Our current OCP was adopted in 2007 and is now 13 years old. Much has happened since the current plan was adopted. Most notable is the recent attention and action in developing our port facilities. The unveiling of the Prince Rupert 2030 The Vision strategy (The 2030 Vision) concluded a significant and collaborative effort to develop a vision for how Prince Rupert would respond to, manage and benefit from the impending growth expected for our ports. This expected port growth is anticipated to see a four-fold increase in trade capacity and could result in a doubling of our population over the next ten years.

The 2030 Vision was developed in a two phase process over three years and its exciting aspirations will be discussed with you and help inform the revision of our OCP. This survey is the next step in revising the OCP and builds on the 2030 Vision process. It will provide you with the opportunity for you to share your views on aspects of the OCP and the 2030 Vision document.

The City also launched a second round of surveys aimed at better understanding public opinion regarding the policy topics of infrastructure, climate change + GHG emissions, food systems/food security, and social services. See below for links to the surveys, which are also being sent via mail to community households. This second round of surveys closed September 15th, 2020. As a small thank you we will be giving ten $50 gift cards to randomly selected people that submit completed questionnaires

In September we will be scheduling short meetings with anyone that wants to come and speak with the Mayor and Planner about the draft OCP. You can sign up for one of these by contacting Executive Assistant, Brianne Bunko at brianne.bunko@princerupert.ca to set up an appointment.

Thank you for your continued interest and participation in this project.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Have an itching question you'd like to ask about the City's Official Community Plan? Ask it here! But first, a bit of context about the purpose of a community's Official Community Plan. 

What is an Official Community Plan? 

An Official Community Plan (OCP) is the long-term guiding document that lays out Council’s objectives for land use, as well as the form and character of development. In simple terms, an OCP shows the future vision of how a community will look, and the different types of activities allowed in each area, and guides all land use planning and development towards this vision. Furthermore, the OCP identifies land use designations and types of development that Council considers appropriate. 

It can also identify policies relating to social, cultural, environmental and infrastructure policy to help govern other aspects of municipal work. 

To access the City's Draft Official Community Plan, which has been provided for community feedback, click this link.

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    I am wondering about the long term plans for the Miller Bay area. Looking at the OCP, it appears that some of the area immediately around the bay has been slated for residential development. Other areas have been slated for Open Space & Park. I believe there are quite a few residents who frequent the area where the quarantine hospital was situated and the associated waterfront. I think there should be more focus set on developing the waterfront of the entire bay, not just the immediated cove by the hospital site, and the old hospital site for community waterfront/recreational access. This is a very accessible area for most residents and can easily be modified to provide ample parking. I would like to receive more information on plans for the Miller Bay area. Thank you.

    edhausner asked about 2 months ago

    Millar Bay is designated as park and open space in the new OCP (Map 1a). Aside from this designation, the City has no long term plans but does anticipate undertaking a Parks Master plan in the future at which time an overall strategy for park development would be prepared.

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    Why does the Prime Minister allow all these Foreign citizens into Canada, they are the ones buying out our lands and homes, we should have first pick on any damn lands of purchase, our Band Councils should have priority in the town houses being built in this town, the Mayor himself should look at it that way and not allow any Realtors/homeowners jack the Rental Price so high, Not everyone works at the Port, the way I see that project running, that hire all Drug Addicts and Drunks, there are families out here suffering and homeless, i am one of them, with two daughters, this couch surfing is getting ridiculous, to the Mayor, Do your job right or hand over your spot to someone that is First Nations, possibly from Port Simpson, we are on their land

    Whatdoesitmatter asked 2 months ago

    The City works within the laws of Canada and British Columbia. Setting policy regarding who can purchase land and homes and to set rental controls are actions outside of the City’s jurisdiction. In terms of the housing challenge, the City is working through this OCP and other more targeted actions to help meet this important challenge.

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    What is being done for housing for familys that are displaced and stuck staying with other relatives and friends ?

    Jeffery asked 2 months ago

    Housing is a major issue in Prince Rupert, as it is in many other communities. Our OCP lays out broad goals and strategies for housing with the objective of meeting the housing needs of the residents. The OCP identifies areas for new housing in the city core and in new neighbourhoods to meet the needs of existing and future residents. Delivery of new housing, however, involves many different parties including the provincial government, private developers and other housing providers. The City’s role is to work with these parties to facilitate the necessary new housing. the City’s The City, for example, is currently inviting developers from across British Columbia and Canada to look at building new housing in Prince Rupert and the City Council has approved a development incentive program to facilitate this housing.

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    Can you ask for affordable housing for people that work? We don’t want to go backwards and end up being homeless or starve. My boyfriend and I live in a two bedroom and I’m not allowed to take my daughter in because she has issues. But I wanted to take my brother in too. I don’t want my family homeless. It’s crazy home owners are asking too high of rent like we are all rich In Prince Rupert. Even hotels are asking monthly high rent. This world is getting worse. I thought City of Prince Rupert cared for our community about there well being? Well I don’t see that. I wish city council can help us all. There’s many many that are looking to rent but asking too much. Singles, family with young kids, family with family members, elders. Please help our community.

    Grams2geets asked 2 months ago

    The City is currently working with the Province of British Columbia and housing providers to provide affordable housing for working people. The Mayor and Council are focussed on addressing this very important community need.

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    Why I prince Rupert not welcoming to international students in terms of jobs and housing?

    Popson bee asked 2 months ago

    While the City is not responsible for directly providing jobs and housing for international students, it does address this by planning for housing and economic development through industrial and commercial development. These are key parts of the OCP.

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    The international student is the most affect in housing problem. What are plans for them in this regard?

    Kingschibu asked 2 months ago

    Although the City is not responsible for directly providing housing for international students, it does address this by planning for housing in the OCP and working with partners to encourage and facilitate new housing.